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Archive for August, 2006

A Chinese Ghost Story Trilogy Boxset (IVL / Fortune Star)

Distributor : IVL / Fortune Star
Audio : DTS-ES 6.1, DD-EX 6.1, Dolby 2.0
Discs : 3
Languages : Cantonese, Mandarin
Format : NTSC
Subtitles : Chinese, English
Running Time : 95, 102, 108 minutes
Contents : 3 DVD, a colour booklet
Screen Ratio : 1.85:1 (movie), 4:3 (bonus)
Classification : IIA
Region : 0 / ALL
Others : -

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The Yuen Clan

by Gary Cheah

The “Yuen Clan” as they’re known in the business, have been in the Hong Kong stunt trade ever since Simon immigrated to the territory from Northern China. He was a home-schooling Beijing Opera teacher who trained his kids in wild acrobatics and kung fu, while guiding them to be stunt men on the screens which he directed.The Yuens cameoe to Hong Kong and opened their imaginations, and pulled out a mind bending new vision for movie martial arts. Raised in poverty, paid a pittance for their bone-breaking work as stuntmen, upon gaining a foothold in the industry, they unleashed displays of hair-raising high weirdness and surreal wirework onto an unsuspecting industry.

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Jackie Chan

by Gary Cheah

 

Jackie Chan Kwong Sang was born in Hong Kong on April 7, 1954. His Chinese name Chan Kwong Sang means ‘Born In Hong Kong’. He was the only child of Charles and Lee-Lee Chan. Jackie was delivered after a 12 months of pregnancy. That was extra 3 months. So, his mother had to have a surgery to bring him out. At his birth, he weighed more than 12 pounds, and that was amazing! Jackie had a nickname called ‘Ah Pao’ which means a cannonball. His parents were so poor that they doesn’t have enough money to pay for the operation. A British doctor who delivered him offers them for a meager $26 – HK$1500 for Jackie, but luckily, Jackie’s parents refused. So, they ended up by borrowing money from their friends to pay up.

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Lam Ching Ying

by Martin Cleary

Although the name may not be familiar to you, if you have watched many Hong Kong films from the Shaw Brothers to Bruce Lee, from Jackie Chan up until the actioners of the 1990’s, then the chances are that you have seen Lam Ching-ying and his work.He is most famous for his role as the Taoist Priest / Vampire hunter of the Mr Vampire films, but Lam Ching-ying has been involved in many of the biggest and most groundbreaking HK films ever made.

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Yuen Biao

by Martin Cleary

Youngest Brother: Yuen Biao
The youngest of Hong Kong’s legendary ‘three brothers’, Yuen Biao is probably the least well known in the West but with his amazing gymnastic flipping and kicking ability and a talent for both comedy and serious acting, Yuen Biao has produced some serious work to equal that of the higher profile Jackie Chan and Sammo Hung.

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